Yihui Wang

Hello Hadden,

I really enjoy reading your post and get inspired by your unique interpretations of prof. Matsumura's questions. I like that you mentioned that we should respect and understand the vast differences between individuals during the pandemic so that we do not need to record or recognize this period of history. I have never thought that not-recorded history could mean respecting people's different life experiences in the past. And I also learned from your point that our lives are not 100% recordable, but the most important thing is to respect the recordable and unrecordable parts of our lives.

Thank you so much for your excellent analysis and interpretation!

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Hello Camden!

I totally agree with your idea that it is impossible to accurately capture what happened in the past two years. I wrote a similar idea in my post that the history we could record is always relatively objective and accurate but never completely accurate.

I also really like how you explain historians could gather the similarities of a group of people to represent "a group" instead of "a individual person" in history. I think this is also a very good method to keep history's comparative objectivity to record the relatively conclusive history.

Overall, thank you for your excellent post, I did learn a lot from it!

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Hi Camden! I like how you structure this journal by first introducing how Japan influenced Korea and Taiwai seperately and make a conclusion by comparing them in the end. And I'm inspired by how you include lecture 3 about Taiwan women's changes in your response. I also like how you write that "a colony that has a strong civil system, better schooling system, and a more educated workforce will bring more value and resources to Japan in the long term". Japan's reformation over its colonies' family structures, laws and education benifited Japan in the low term by providing the colonial society a peaceful and regulated enviroment to develop economics.

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